My name is Charlie. I am currently a 20 year old college student at Kent state university. I am majoring in criminology and justice studies. This blog is going to be for and about whatever it is I feel at that moment.

 

mortisia:

Okiku Doll
There is no doubting that dolls are creepy. Those big bug-like eyes are enough to turn the stomach. But what about a doll possessed by a girl’s ghost? Introducing the Okiku doll, named after the doll’s first owner. The doll is quite big—40 centimeters (1’3″) in height—wears a kimono, and has hair that grows. Yes. Hair that grows.The Okiku doll can be found at the Mannenji temple in Iwamizawa, in Hokkaido prefecture. When the doll first appeared in the temple it had cropped hair, but over the years the hair has grown like a hippie’s—to a whopping 25 centimeters (10 in). According to some, the hair is annually trimmed.The legend goes that a teenage boy bought the doll for his two-year-old sister, Okiku. Okiku loved the doll; she played with it every day, dressed it up, spoke to it. Tragically, their friendship was short-lived: The girl died. Her family refused to get rid of the doll. After some time, they noticed its hair was growing, so they concluded that the spirit of their daughter resided within the doll. In 1938, they made the executive decision to hand the doll over to the temple, where it remains to this very day.

mortisia:

Okiku Doll

There is no doubting that dolls are creepy. Those big bug-like eyes are enough to turn the stomach. But what about a doll possessed by a girl’s ghost? Introducing the Okiku doll, named after the doll’s first owner. The doll is quite big—40 centimeters (1’3″) in height—wears a kimono, and has hair that grows. Yes. Hair that grows.The Okiku doll can be found at the Mannenji temple in Iwamizawa, in Hokkaido prefecture. When the doll first appeared in the temple it had cropped hair, but over the years the hair has grown like a hippie’s—to a whopping 25 centimeters (10 in). According to some, the hair is annually trimmed.The legend goes that a teenage boy bought the doll for his two-year-old sister, Okiku. Okiku loved the doll; she played with it every day, dressed it up, spoke to it. Tragically, their friendship was short-lived: The girl died. Her family refused to get rid of the doll. After some time, they noticed its hair was growing, so they concluded that the spirit of their daughter resided within the doll. In 1938, they made the executive decision to hand the doll over to the temple, where it remains to this very day.

Teke Teke

x-nightmare-x-fuel-x:

The Teke Teke is the ghost of a young woman who fell on a rail way line and was cut in half by the oncoming train. Now a vengeful spirit, she carries a scythe and travels on either her hand or elbows, her dragging upper torso making a scratching or teke teke sound….

Death sentence

okaruto:

After trying and trying to have a baby, a certain woman was finally able to get pregnant. She and her husband were thrilled when the little girl was born, and as she grew older, the parents only loved her more.

After quite a few months, she got to the age where she began to speak.

aminoasinine:

new 3ds with new buttons and features

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new games that aren’t compatible with the old 3ds

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mymompickedthisurl:

that feeling when you listen to a song with good heaphones for the first time and suddenly you notice 7 new instruments, a child singing harmonies in the background, and you’re just sitting there wide eyed and in love with the song all over again

sir-dashing:

escapekit:

Pop Culture Crayons

Artist Hoang Tran creates tiny sculptures using large-size Crayola crayons, the artist delicately hand-carves them into pop-culture icons.

My baby girl needs these!

(Source: mymodernmet.com)